Posts filed under ‘Studies’

Movin’ Out!

We are outta’ here!

….and moving to our new location on our website – www.mtuitive.com/blog/

There we’ll have our opinions about the latest from the world of surgery, pathology, evidence-based medicine, structured data, synoptic reporting, and a whole host of other issues. There will be more writers covering more areas of discussion. So please head on over to learn more about us (although it may take a few days for it to stop looking so wonky).

www.mtuitive.com/blog/

August 2, 2011 at 3:35 pm Leave a comment

Best Behavioral Study Ever?

Reddit alerted me to this excellent study conducted in Brockton, Massachusetts and published in the Fall 1974 volume of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis:

Be sure to check out the follow up study.

January 13, 2011 at 11:19 am Leave a comment

EHR – Part v. Whole

Piecemeal vs. Wholesale

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recently released the results from the 2008 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), which is “an annual nationally representative survey of patient visits to office-based physicians that collects information on use of EMR/EHR.”  Approximately 5,200 physicians (3,200 surveys conducted in person; 2,000 over the phone) responded to this survey, which is conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics since 2001.   The survey is designed to figure out how many physicians have purchased some product to serve as the Electronic Health Records (EHRs) – also referred to as Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) – and how many are utilizing those products.

There has been a big push for adoption of electronic health records, especially since the government set a goal of having most Americans have an EHR by 2014 (set in 2004 by then President George W. Bush, and has been re-affirmed by President Obama).  Increased funding from the Department of Health & Human Services for electronic medical records and products that electronically capture health information has also led to a boom in the Health IT industry and a diversity of options for health professionals from which they can choose.

But such an abundance of choices combined with the rush to adopt EHRs has left many people wondering – what’s the best product out there? Perhaps the better question is – what’s the best approach for implementing this new system?

Survey results, rising doubts and some ideas after the jump…

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February 10, 2010 at 10:06 am 2 comments

Step By Step – How Checklists Can Help in the OR

Dr. Atul Gawande is a general and endocrine surgeon at Brigham & Women’s Hospital as well as the associate director for their Center for Surgery & Public Health.  He has gained prominence by writing about his experiences in the operating room as well as examining best practices for surgeons and hospitals in such publications as Slate.com, The New Yorker and two books, Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science and Better: A Surgeon’s Notes on Performance.

In his latest book, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, Dr. Gawande discusses the need to implement a standardized checklist routine for surgeons before they start a procedure.  By ensuring that simple steps are taken, surgeons are able to cut down on factors that may lead to complications, including infections.  He went on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart last night to discuss his new book, what he found when the checklists were implemented, and – somehow – Star Wars. The interview can be found here.

More on Dr. Gawande’s work and how to implement these checklists after the jump:

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February 4, 2010 at 3:08 pm Leave a comment

iPads, PDAs and Smartphones, Oh My!

As I’ve posted on Twitter a couple of times, versions of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are being developed and deployed at a much faster clip.  This is partially due to the increased funding available via government grants, but also reflects the rise of prominence of technology in society as well as recognizing the benefits of those technologies.

Additionally, various aspects of the medical field are being broken up and addressed by different companies – resulting in pre-operative management systems, peri-operative management systems, capturing of prescriptions, electronic history & physical, image capture & storage from MRIs and X-Rays.

Advances in technologies are constantly occurring – with improvements to both software and hardware happening at a faster rate than ever before in human history.  This means that each advancement brings with it new possibilities and new capabilities that should help our daily lives and our professions.  But do they actually improve our workflow?

Last week, Apple announced their exciting new iPad product and set the web ablaze with people wondering what it was capable of, and what they really wanted it to do.  In light of the iPad premiere, we at mTuitive have been thinking about what future of Health IT and handheld electronics will look like.

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February 2, 2010 at 11:56 am 1 comment

Welcome to Reports From the O.R.!

Welcome!

This is a blog that will discuss advances and topics in the realm of postoperative reporting.  We will publish posts discussing such issues as:

  • Compliance
  • Standardization
  • Synoptic Reporting
  • Health IT
  • And much, much more!

As we develop our new electronic postoperative reporting product (mTuitive OpNote), we come across all sorts of data that we think is very interesting and should be shared and discussed with others.  Please feel free to leave comments, email us with any questions or ideas for topics that might interest you.

We expect to be publishing new posts fairly regularly, so be sure to check back often!

January 26, 2010 at 2:31 pm Leave a comment


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