Posts tagged ‘Dictation’

Dr. John Mattson: “The Paradigm of the Future Hastens the Demise of Dictation”

There’s a new opinion piece by Dr. John Mattson in Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Entitled “3 Reasons Justifying Synoptic Data in Surgical Operative Reports,” the piece examines the inherent problems with dictation and the multiple ways that synoptic reporting improves on this increasingly antiquated system.

Click here to read it!

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January 7, 2011 at 4:17 pm 1 comment

Health Information Managers – We Want to Hear From You!

While developing OpNote, mTuitive has sent out numerous surveys to various sectors of the healthcare industry. We’ve heard from surgeons, coders and hospital administrators to help us figure out the best ways to improve postoperative reporting. By gaining feedback from domain experts (and our targeted customers), we can identify issues that need to be addressed in the current system and more accurately create solutions for everyone that would be affected by adoption of mTuitive OpNote.

We are now reaching out to HIM professionals to gain their perspective and build the business case. If you are unfamiliar with the design of OpNote, please follow this link for an example of a completed report. OpNote’s goals are to make better use of transcription resources, streamline the reporting process and capture discrete data for use in disease registries, outcomes analysis and quality reporting initiatives.

Thank you for your time and your input!

Click here to take survey

June 2, 2010 at 5:13 pm Leave a comment

OpNote Demo: Creating New Reports

Below is the two-part video that demonstrates how to create new postoperative reports with mTuitive OpNote.

If you would like a personalized demo with a member of the mTuitive staff to answer all your questions, please contact us today.

Part 1 of 2

The exciting conclusion can be found after the jump!

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May 17, 2010 at 3:44 pm Leave a comment

An Overview of OpNote & Some Site News

Below you will find a video that introduces the concept, design and purpose of the product we’ve been working on for a while – the mTuitive OpNote.

Over the next few weeks, there will be some changes to this blog. Nothing is going away or being replaced. However, as we roll out our new product, the blog will be more of a hybrid showing various aspects of OpNote, including videos showing how to perform various tasks with it, along with the pieces we’ve been posting about transcription, Health IT and all other manner of medical nerdery. The posts we write tend to show off our thinking and philosophy on how information technology should be used in the medical field – and we believe the OpNote embodies that way of thinking. OpNote is our philosophy in practice and we hope you like what you see.

May 7, 2010 at 1:41 pm Leave a comment

Relativity in Reporting

How long does it take a surgeon to complete a postoperative report?

It seems like a straightforward question and it’s been one of our main focuses as we’ve developed the OpNote, our electronic postoperative reporting product.  In order to ensure adoption by users, we know that we can’t tax the user’s (in this case, a physician’s) time any more than they already spend on reporting.  So we had to determine how much time physicians spend generating their own postoperative reports.  This was mainly done through anecdotal means – speaking with various surgeons and asking them how long it takes for them to complete a report.

And that’s when we learned something interesting.  Surgeons would tell us it would only take 30 seconds to 5 minutes to complete their report, depending on the level of complexity of the procedure.  But is that accurate?  As we gathered information and stories of postoperative reporting – we noticed that the way physicians think about report completion may not be as correct as they think.

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April 1, 2010 at 2:50 pm Leave a comment

Dictation is Public Enemy #1

Pete O’Toole

Healthcare is the biggest political issue in the US right now.  It’s a huge financial problem for everyone – individuals, businesses, the government and healthcare providers themselves.  It’s become so overwhelming that it has gridlocked congress.  The word “healthcare” just deflates everyone in the room each time it is uttered.  Despite all the frustration and everyone’s acceptance that “healthcare is broken,” most of us can’t name concrete problems in healthcare.  There is a vague sense that sometimes too many tests are ordered, but when it’s you who may need the tests, it’s not a problem.  Personally, I think that modern medicine is amazing, and nowhere in the world is it taught or practiced better than in the US.

I prefer to look for solutions to this crisis in places that do not take away from patient care.  For me, the first place to look is not in cutting screening for cancers – even if “only” 1 in 1000 people in a certain age range may actually test positive.  I think 1 person in 1000 is actually quite a lot to dismiss.  I realize there are excesses in the administration of healthcare — doctors who might be gaming the system, patients who might be hypochondriacs and lawyers who force doctors to practice overly defensively — and that it needs to be addressed.

The world's most powerful computer at Columbia University's Watson Lab, 1954.

There are many other places we can look to save money in healthcare.  One problem that will probably only get worse is medical transcription.  Decades ago, it made more sense for doctors to speak into a microphone and let a professional typist translate that dictation into a typed sheet of paper, than it did to try to make every doctor a professional typist.  When the first computerized medical records came out in the late 1960s, this practice naturally moved right over to support entry into these systems.  In fact, these systems were little more than glorified word processors, and many of them unfortunately have not progressed much beyond that point.  Early computer applications, although exciting, were hard to use.  Human-computer interaction as a field was barely born and would not influence the industry for a long time.  In the 1960s, this workflow made perfect sense.  Let doctors treat patients and let typists type.

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March 15, 2010 at 5:33 am Leave a comment


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