Posts tagged ‘Health IT’

Dr. John Mattson: “The Paradigm of the Future Hastens the Demise of Dictation”

There’s a new opinion piece by Dr. John Mattson in Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Entitled “3 Reasons Justifying Synoptic Data in Surgical Operative Reports,” the piece examines the inherent problems with dictation and the multiple ways that synoptic reporting improves on this increasingly antiquated system.

Click here to read it!

January 7, 2011 at 4:17 pm 1 comment

Sea Changes Can’t Be Overnight Occurrences

September 30, 2013

Patients receiving treatment at a health facility in the US will be assigned ICD-9 codes for their diagnoses.

October 1, 2013

Patients receiving treatment at a health facility in the US will be assigned ICD-10 codes for their diagnoses.

…What a difference a day makes.

As mentioned previously on this site, ICD coding system is an excellent, standardized way of tracking important diagnostic information. The current system in place is ICD-9, which has about 17,000 codes, and is used for symptoms, diagnoses, injuries, diseases and all other disorders facing patients. The new system is ICD-10, and it will have 155,000 codes – covering the same grouping of symptoms, diagnoses and the rest as ICD-9 – but with a lot more specificity.

I’ve been of the opinion that this transition wouldn’t be too painful. In fact, with the intelligent structure of the ICD-10 codes, where each character represents a specific quality of that code (such as location in the body, severity, etiology, etc.), I thought it could be a real boon to medical professionals. Sure, it would be a hard adjustment, but it’s one that’s about 15 years overdue. As I continue to read about ICD-10 and its impending implementation, I was curious about the plan for phasing it in to the current workflow. Based on everything I’ve read so far – I have a confession to make:

I was wrong – this is going to be a disaster.


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October 12, 2010 at 10:44 am Leave a comment

mTuitive’s New Website!

Self-Promotion Alert!

The Internet's Inner Workings...Revealed!
(click image to see it in motion)

mTuitive recently updated our website. Please check it out today – we’ve made some changes to the content, the layout and other aspects. Let us know what you think! You can either go to http://www.mtuitive.com/ or click on the button below!

(Thanks and regular/non-brand plugging posts will continue shortly)

September 16, 2010 at 12:28 pm 1 comment

A Scanner Darkly

The awkward phase. It’s an unpleasant nebulous moment between two well-defined points. That uncomfortable time as people go from childhood and adulthood. Or that fearful moment full of panic as you go from dating to being in a serious relationship with someone else. It’s that interim state where you’re no longer A but you’re not quite B either.

Medical reporting is currently in its own awkward phase.

In the not so distant past lies Paper Based Reporting – filling out forms using pen and pencil, typewriters, printing out reports and having physical copies of every document located somewhere. This is the world of triplicate, of faxes and envelopes, of white-out and paper shredders. Paper charts physically shipped or moved from practice to practice, facility to facility. Paperland, as I like to call it, does have its advantages, though: a physical document that proves that something happened and to which people can refer; an artifact that precisely records how something occurred at that date and time, without any fear of tampering; a collection of data that cannot be wiped out by a virus or any sort of IT snafu.

Meanwhile, in the not so distant future lies Electronic Based Reporting – entering every information via computers. Using synoptic reports to enter structured data, information is culled directly from machines (think of vital signs being automatically recorded and logged), or easily entered using touchscreens, mouse & keyboard or a stylus of some sort. Electronic reports allow for faster sending of information to a wider range of places. Specialized fields ensure consistency in language and information captured. Required fields and “checklist” approaches encourage more completeness in reporting and more pertinent information is readily captured.1 However, Tronworld, as I’ll refer to it, has its own share of problems. Information can be lost or stolen without any physical backups. There’s ensuring that all systems are speaking the same language when interfacing, so there’s no loss of data or need to reformat the data every time you go from one system to another.

So, between here and there, betwixt Paperland and Tronworld, lies us currently. How are people bridging the divide between the two different modes of reporting? The answer…might surprise you.
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September 13, 2010 at 9:12 am Leave a comment

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