Posts tagged ‘Healthcare’

Dr. John Mattson – Streamlining Postoperative Reporting


Orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Mattson, a consultant to mTuitive OpNote, recently gave an interview to Healthcare Informatics about the benefits of mTuitive OpNote and how his experiences with reporting helped inform OpNote’s development.

Click here to read the whole interview!

November 30, 2010 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

Health Information Managers – We Want to Hear From You!

While developing OpNote, mTuitive has sent out numerous surveys to various sectors of the healthcare industry. We’ve heard from surgeons, coders and hospital administrators to help us figure out the best ways to improve postoperative reporting. By gaining feedback from domain experts (and our targeted customers), we can identify issues that need to be addressed in the current system and more accurately create solutions for everyone that would be affected by adoption of mTuitive OpNote.

We are now reaching out to HIM professionals to gain their perspective and build the business case. If you are unfamiliar with the design of OpNote, please follow this link for an example of a completed report. OpNote’s goals are to make better use of transcription resources, streamline the reporting process and capture discrete data for use in disease registries, outcomes analysis and quality reporting initiatives.

Thank you for your time and your input!

Click here to take survey

June 2, 2010 at 5:13 pm Leave a comment

Introducing the OpNote Consultants: Carl Brown, MD, MSc, FRCSC

While creating our surgical reporting product, the OpNote, we at mTuitive have been working with many highly skilled surgeons.  These surgeons are from a diverse group of specialties and backgrounds and help to shape the future and efficacy of the OpNote.  We’re introducing these consultants to all of you in the coming weeks.

Dr. Carl Brown completed medical school at McMaster University in 1995 and his general surgery training at the University of Calgary in 2003.  He subsequently worked as a general surgeon at the Peter Lougheed Centre in Calgary.  In 2004, he moved to Toronto to train as a sub specialist in Colorectal Surgery. Concurrent with his fellowship, Dr. Brown completed his master’s degree in clinical research at the University of Toronto.   In 2006, he joined the surgical staff of St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver.

Dr. Brown is the chairman of the Research and Outcomes Evaluation Committee at the British Columbia Cancer Agency and an active member of the Colorectal Cancer Outcomes Unit. He is a member of the Surgical Oncology Network of British Columbia Executive. The goal of these groups is to improve the outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer through research initiatives.

Dr. Brown is the assistant program director of the general surgery residency program at the University of British Columbia. He coordinates the Surgery Leadership Program for general surgery trainees.  Over the past three years, Dr. Brown has published several studies on surgery for colorectal cancer, the ileal pouch procedure and surgery for Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, he has taught courses in laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery.

How did you get interested in medicine?

I was always interested in science but, more importantly, I like interacting with people and helping people.  While it may seem cliché, [medicine] has turned out to be everything I had hoped it would be.  I do get to help people every day.  There’s never a day that I go home after work without feeling satisfied that I’ve accomplished something.

Wow – that’s great.

Yeah, it’s really true.  You know, it sounds kind of clichéd and maybe even a little cheesy, but it is so true.

What attracted you to surgery?  What made you go with that specialty out of all the possible paths in medicine?

Firstly, I’m a fix-it kind of guy.  I like to fix things.  It’s always been something I’ve been fairly strong at – growing up in a small town, we always took it upon ourselves to fix things around the house.   A lot of what we do in medicine is tweaking things: giving a little medication to make someone feel a little bit better.  And that is very important.

But I like the “fix”.  I like the stress and the pressure of having someone who has a life threatening illness and taking on the incredible responsibility and trust of that person by operating on them.  Many times what I do cures the person of that problem.  It’s very gratifying – very immediate.  It’s sort of what I think medicine’s all about.

How did you first hear about mTuitive and the OpNote product?

I’m an academic surgeon at a major Canadian university.  My main research interest for over seven years now has been synoptic reporting and improving processes of care in surgery.  About 6 years ago I published an article in the journal Surgery about synoptic reporting and its benefits.  It’s always been an interest of mine.

Concurrently, as I’ve worked through my career, I’ve become more interested in cancer.  There’s a big push to have synoptic reporting in cancer surgery – much like there is excellent synoptic reporting in cancer pathology.  I feel strongly that [synoptic reporting in surgery] is a simple thing that we can add that can potentially improve patient care and save lives.

Through my work with the provincial organization in British Columbia I was introduced to the mTuitive products.  I saw it as a possible solution to a lot of our problems.

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March 26, 2010 at 4:18 pm Leave a comment

Strategies for a Brave New World

Via Minnesota 2020

Despite our current economic climate, with its historic unemployment numbers, studies are showing that there will be a workforce shortage in healthcare within the next 5 – 10 years.  This conclusion has been drawn from multiple reports issued from different investigative committees – including committees formed by the American Hospital Association and the National Academies – Institute of Medicine.  So while it’s hard to think of any sector right now wanting for jobs – that appears to be the direction in which healthcare is heading.

One of the key issues exacerbating the declining worker population is the impending retirement of around 78 million members of the “Baby Boomer” generation.  As National Academies points out, currently there is one physician trained in geriatric medicine for every 2,500 older Americans.  The average 75 year-old American has three chronic conditions and uses at least four prescription medications.  As this demographic expands (as Baby Boomers age), this will mean an increase in patients who need more care, more attention and more workers.

What are solutions to this problem?  How can health professionals ensure that this steep decline in workers won’t translate into a lack of care for patients or added stress on an already overextended workforce?  And how do Health IT products – like the mTuitive OpNote – help physicians and facilities improve their workflows and organizations to cope with this transition?

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March 19, 2010 at 4:02 pm Leave a comment

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