Posts tagged ‘Software’

Introducing the OpNote Consultants: Dr. Roger N. Chabra

While creating our surgical reporting product, the OpNote, we at mTuitive have been working with many highly skilled surgeons.  These surgeons are from a diverse group of specialties and backgrounds and help to shape the future and efficacy of the OpNote.  We’re introducing these consultants to all of you in the coming weeks.

Dr. Roger Nathan Chabra graduated in 1962 from Christian Medical College of Punjab University in India.  For his post-graduate surgical training, he went to the United Kingdom and became Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh in 1969.

In 1970, he emigrated to the United States and went through a complete surgical residency program at Boston University Medical Center.  He joined Cape Cod Hospital as Attending General Surgeon in 1974 where he worked until his retirement in 2000.

During his time at Cape Cod Hospital he was on the faculty of Boston University Medical School as Clinical Instructor in Surgery and was involved in training surgical residents and medical students rotating through the hospital, which is an affiliate of the Department of Surgery at Boston University Hospital.

How did you get interested in medicine?

Where I grew up, in India, there’s a lot of influence of the parents.   In a subtle way, they decide what their children are going to be.  So there was this slow…”brainwashing” may be too strong a term.

(Laughs)

But that was going on all the time.  It was almost difficult to escape that concept.  In a country like India, you do not want to disappoint your parents, or make them unhappy because you chose something different than what they wanted.

So the die was cast, as far as I was concerned.

Why did you decide to become a surgeon?

I had surgery at a very young age.  I was in this magnificent hospital and I saw the aura around the surgeon and the nurses.   The reverence and respect they received.

“My god,” I said, “I want to be like them one of these days.”

So that drove me into surgery.  My original field was going to be chest surgery, because I had thoracic surgery done on myself.  That didn’t pan out, so instead I became a general surgeon.

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March 5, 2010 at 4:27 pm 1 comment

EHR – Part v. Whole

Piecemeal vs. Wholesale

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recently released the results from the 2008 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), which is “an annual nationally representative survey of patient visits to office-based physicians that collects information on use of EMR/EHR.”  Approximately 5,200 physicians (3,200 surveys conducted in person; 2,000 over the phone) responded to this survey, which is conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics since 2001.   The survey is designed to figure out how many physicians have purchased some product to serve as the Electronic Health Records (EHRs) – also referred to as Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) – and how many are utilizing those products.

There has been a big push for adoption of electronic health records, especially since the government set a goal of having most Americans have an EHR by 2014 (set in 2004 by then President George W. Bush, and has been re-affirmed by President Obama).  Increased funding from the Department of Health & Human Services for electronic medical records and products that electronically capture health information has also led to a boom in the Health IT industry and a diversity of options for health professionals from which they can choose.

But such an abundance of choices combined with the rush to adopt EHRs has left many people wondering – what’s the best product out there? Perhaps the better question is – what’s the best approach for implementing this new system?

Survey results, rising doubts and some ideas after the jump…

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February 10, 2010 at 10:06 am 2 comments

iPads, PDAs and Smartphones, Oh My!

As I’ve posted on Twitter a couple of times, versions of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are being developed and deployed at a much faster clip.  This is partially due to the increased funding available via government grants, but also reflects the rise of prominence of technology in society as well as recognizing the benefits of those technologies.

Additionally, various aspects of the medical field are being broken up and addressed by different companies – resulting in pre-operative management systems, peri-operative management systems, capturing of prescriptions, electronic history & physical, image capture & storage from MRIs and X-Rays.

Advances in technologies are constantly occurring – with improvements to both software and hardware happening at a faster rate than ever before in human history.  This means that each advancement brings with it new possibilities and new capabilities that should help our daily lives and our professions.  But do they actually improve our workflow?

Last week, Apple announced their exciting new iPad product and set the web ablaze with people wondering what it was capable of, and what they really wanted it to do.  In light of the iPad premiere, we at mTuitive have been thinking about what future of Health IT and handheld electronics will look like.

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February 2, 2010 at 11:56 am 1 comment


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Disclosure Statement - The authors of this blog are paid employees of mTuitive Inc. and are compensated for their services.