Posts tagged ‘Synoptic Reporting’

Movin’ Out!

We are outta’ here!

….and moving to our new location on our website – www.mtuitive.com/blog/

There we’ll have our opinions about the latest from the world of surgery, pathology, evidence-based medicine, structured data, synoptic reporting, and a whole host of other issues. There will be more writers covering more areas of discussion. So please head on over to learn more about us (although it may take a few days for it to stop looking so wonky).

www.mtuitive.com/blog/

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August 2, 2011 at 3:35 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (Part 2)

In Part One of my attempt at bringing Structured Data from the lofty heights of rhetoric and down into the every day real world, I used America’s favorite 3 hours of intermittent action – Baseball!

I suggest a new strategy, R2: let the Wookiee win.

It was a good, illustrative example of structured data – however, it was a bit impractical. Not many people conduct baseball research using data collected by statisticians. Structured Data may still seem foreign to those not interested in mapping how badly the Red Sox will break your heart this season using metrics and regressions. So let’s get even more grounded and practical – and in doing so, we’ll also examine synoptic reporting, a term that tends to accompany structured data but is not a synonym. So let’s see how we utilize structured data on a near daily basis. Let’s all head to the kitchen!

Last Known Photo of the Inventor of the Double Down


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August 20, 2010 at 2:46 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (part 1)

Still trying to find that needle...

Sometimes it feels like my job wholly consists of talking about structured data. I give definitions and abstract examples – but it’s not easy to help people understand the real benefits of it. And so, as I try to find the best way to get my point across, I often think of real world examples of how structured data is useful in our daily lives and why it tends to be preferable to unstructured, narrative text.

With that in mind – let’s go out to the ball park!

THAT's the Chicago way!

Baseball. America’s Past Time. The Sweet Science. City of Lights. The Ghost and the darkness.

Okay, I’m not the biggest baseball fan. I will watch playoffs and world series. But I do know that a lot of baseball is about numbers: strike outs, home runs, bases stolen, RBIs, wins, losses, saves, ERAs, pitches thrown. Each of these play a crucial factor in determining how well your team is doing or how a player is perceived by his fans. And, following theories like those laid out in Moneyball, these metrics can even determine who will be signed on to your favorite team.

So what does this have to do with structured data? Glad you asked!
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August 18, 2010 at 3:59 pm 2 comments

From the Ashes: Ensuring that Your Health IT Data is Secured & Easy to Recover

The Most Popular Recovery Plan Today (Via Leonid Manchenkov's blog)

“Expect the unexpected.”

It’s one of those oxymoronic idioms that have become so ingrained in our culture, it’s hard to determine its origins but it’s taken as a universal truth. Obviously, if you expect the unexpected, then it’s no longer unexpected; but it’s not meant to be a literal set of instructions. As we all know, expect the unexpected means to assume that things will go wrong, or to at least have some contingencies in case your plan doesn’t work out as you intended them. I was reminded of this phrase while reading this list of Top 5 EHR Adoption Barriers and came upon the last one:

Can the Networks Support the Data?
Today’s data explosion is driven by many industries, but healthcare records and imaging are fueling a big part of the growth. Healthcare providers are worried about the complex networking capabilities and their ability to handle the 24×7 influx of massive amounts of data and the disaster recovery plans needed to support that data. VARs play a pivotal role in the networking and disaster recovery markets, so smart VARs will use their knowledge to close the deal.

It was an interesting issue that I hadn’t spent much time thinking about. That’s not to say that we hadn’t taken all of this into account when designing our products, but I personally had never conceived that this would be an obstacle or imposing barrier to health facilities that want to adopt electronic health solutions. And that’s when I decided to look at our products to see how they fare if the unexpected happened and we needed to recover data.
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July 1, 2010 at 2:28 pm Leave a comment

Interview with Dr. Jared Ament: A New Way to Tell an Old Story

Dr. Jared D. Ament recently completed clinical research fellowships at Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) and at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center (UMass) in surgical outcomes. He has worked with Dr. Dohlman (MEEI) and Dr. Black (Brigham and Women’s Hospital) for 3 years now and with Dr. Richard Moser (UMass) for the last year. His MD is from the Medical School for International Health, a collaborative initiative between Ben-Gurion and Columbia Universities. His MPH is from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is adjunct faculty at Harvard Medical School’s department of Population Health and Epidemiology and has specific interests in cost-effectiveness research, international surgery, surgical outcomes, and medical education. He is currently a surgical resident at UMass.

How did you become interested in medicine?

I was a kid who was fascinated by the workings of the body. I was also very involved in martial arts and interested in the inherent mechanics and physiology. And then, as a teenager interested in culture and public health, I traveled extensively to non-industrialized countries, volunteering in all sorts of public health efforts. I guess I just found a niche where working with people from many cultures, coupled with my fascination for human physiology, struck a cord. The left side of the equation seemed to equal “medicine” on the right.

And how did you decide on being a surgeon, specifically?

Many people just know; for a select minority, however, it’s a struggle between the operating rooms of surgery and the diagnostics and offices of internal medicine (and its specialty fields). I always loved surgery and truly knew that the operating room was where I belonged. Yet, I struggled, as the detective work and thorough understanding of bodily functions was tantalizing. My conclusion, however, was that a good surgeon should, first and foremost, be very strong, clinically. They are, too, diagnosticians, physicians, empathic healers, that have dedicated significant time and training to perfecting a tactile skill in addition to, and very much in parallel with, their medical skills. I am still in training but truly enjoy both the clinic and operating room. I need both. I enjoy the time with my patients; the interaction; the teaching and learning that takes place (bi-directional); collaborating with colleagues (surgical and medical); and hold the operating room, the unconscious patient and the delicate work to be performed with the utmost of respect.
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June 22, 2010 at 1:22 pm 2 comments

Health Information Managers – We Want to Hear From You!

While developing OpNote, mTuitive has sent out numerous surveys to various sectors of the healthcare industry. We’ve heard from surgeons, coders and hospital administrators to help us figure out the best ways to improve postoperative reporting. By gaining feedback from domain experts (and our targeted customers), we can identify issues that need to be addressed in the current system and more accurately create solutions for everyone that would be affected by adoption of mTuitive OpNote.

We are now reaching out to HIM professionals to gain their perspective and build the business case. If you are unfamiliar with the design of OpNote, please follow this link for an example of a completed report. OpNote’s goals are to make better use of transcription resources, streamline the reporting process and capture discrete data for use in disease registries, outcomes analysis and quality reporting initiatives.

Thank you for your time and your input!

Click here to take survey

June 2, 2010 at 5:13 pm Leave a comment

Use Your Words: The Importance of Structured Data


One of the uphill battles that mTuitive has faced over the years has been convincing people the value of structured data. Actually, to step back, the uphill battle has been defining structured data and then explaining its import to various medical facilities. Luckily, that battle is progressively easier as more studies are published on the strengths of synoptic reporting and as the term grows in popularity and familiarity. What was once a part of a sales pitch is quickly becoming unnecessary as people are getting much more comfortable with the idea of structured data and interested in how it can immediately help their organizations. A recent piece in California HealthCare Foundation’s Issue Brief does a great job of illuminating the various levels of data and why there’s not only a growing need but also a growing desire for employing these techniques in health facilities.
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May 14, 2010 at 3:09 pm 1 comment

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