Posts tagged ‘Synoptic Reporting’

Movin’ Out!

We are outta’ here!

….and moving to our new location on our website – www.mtuitive.com/blog/

There we’ll have our opinions about the latest from the world of surgery, pathology, evidence-based medicine, structured data, synoptic reporting, and a whole host of other issues. There will be more writers covering more areas of discussion. So please head on over to learn more about us (although it may take a few days for it to stop looking so wonky).

www.mtuitive.com/blog/

August 2, 2011 at 3:35 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (Part 2)

In Part One of my attempt at bringing Structured Data from the lofty heights of rhetoric and down into the every day real world, I used America’s favorite 3 hours of intermittent action – Baseball!

I suggest a new strategy, R2: let the Wookiee win.

It was a good, illustrative example of structured data – however, it was a bit impractical. Not many people conduct baseball research using data collected by statisticians. Structured Data may still seem foreign to those not interested in mapping how badly the Red Sox will break your heart this season using metrics and regressions. So let’s get even more grounded and practical – and in doing so, we’ll also examine synoptic reporting, a term that tends to accompany structured data but is not a synonym. So let’s see how we utilize structured data on a near daily basis. Let’s all head to the kitchen!

Last Known Photo of the Inventor of the Double Down


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August 20, 2010 at 2:46 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (part 1)

Still trying to find that needle...

Sometimes it feels like my job wholly consists of talking about structured data. I give definitions and abstract examples – but it’s not easy to help people understand the real benefits of it. And so, as I try to find the best way to get my point across, I often think of real world examples of how structured data is useful in our daily lives and why it tends to be preferable to unstructured, narrative text.

With that in mind – let’s go out to the ball park!

THAT's the Chicago way!

Baseball. America’s Past Time. The Sweet Science. City of Lights. The Ghost and the darkness.

Okay, I’m not the biggest baseball fan. I will watch playoffs and world series. But I do know that a lot of baseball is about numbers: strike outs, home runs, bases stolen, RBIs, wins, losses, saves, ERAs, pitches thrown. Each of these play a crucial factor in determining how well your team is doing or how a player is perceived by his fans. And, following theories like those laid out in Moneyball, these metrics can even determine who will be signed on to your favorite team.

So what does this have to do with structured data? Glad you asked!
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August 18, 2010 at 3:59 pm 2 comments

From the Ashes: Ensuring that Your Health IT Data is Secured & Easy to Recover

The Most Popular Recovery Plan Today (Via Leonid Manchenkov's blog)

“Expect the unexpected.”

It’s one of those oxymoronic idioms that have become so ingrained in our culture, it’s hard to determine its origins but it’s taken as a universal truth. Obviously, if you expect the unexpected, then it’s no longer unexpected; but it’s not meant to be a literal set of instructions. As we all know, expect the unexpected means to assume that things will go wrong, or to at least have some contingencies in case your plan doesn’t work out as you intended them. I was reminded of this phrase while reading this list of Top 5 EHR Adoption Barriers and came upon the last one:

Can the Networks Support the Data?
Today’s data explosion is driven by many industries, but healthcare records and imaging are fueling a big part of the growth. Healthcare providers are worried about the complex networking capabilities and their ability to handle the 24×7 influx of massive amounts of data and the disaster recovery plans needed to support that data. VARs play a pivotal role in the networking and disaster recovery markets, so smart VARs will use their knowledge to close the deal.

It was an interesting issue that I hadn’t spent much time thinking about. That’s not to say that we hadn’t taken all of this into account when designing our products, but I personally had never conceived that this would be an obstacle or imposing barrier to health facilities that want to adopt electronic health solutions. And that’s when I decided to look at our products to see how they fare if the unexpected happened and we needed to recover data.
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July 1, 2010 at 2:28 pm Leave a comment

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