Posts tagged ‘synoptic’

Dr. John Mattson: “The Paradigm of the Future Hastens the Demise of Dictation”

There’s a new opinion piece by Dr. John Mattson in Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Entitled “3 Reasons Justifying Synoptic Data in Surgical Operative Reports,” the piece examines the inherent problems with dictation and the multiple ways that synoptic reporting improves on this increasingly antiquated system.

Click here to read it!

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January 7, 2011 at 4:17 pm 1 comment

SourceMedical Partners with mTuitive to Improve Postoperative Reporting for ASCs and Surgeons

Continues SourceMedical’s tradition of comprehensive solutions for all of surgeons’ needs while utilizing mTuitive’s expertise with electronic medical reporting.

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Birmingham, AL, November 15, 2010 – SourceMedical today announced a partnership with mTuitive, Inc. to help ASCs and surgeons improve postoperative reporting and streamline medical coding processes. Built upon mTuitive’s electronic postoperative reporting solution and fully integrated with the AdvantX, Vision and SurgiSource applications, SourcePlus OpNote will provide ASCs and specialty hospitals with immediate access to surgeons’ postoperative reports and coding data leading to more rapid and accurate revenue cycle processes.

“As an orthopedic surgeon who does exclusively outpatient procedures, I see significant value in the integration of mTuitive’s OpNote into SourceMedical’s management software such as improved reporting for participating ASCs,” said Dr. John Mattson, an active user of the OpNote system. “After a short learning curve, surgeons will find that SourcePlus OpNote is faster than dictating and far less onerous for surgeons as the repetition present in 90 percent of operative reports is eliminated. We now produce superior operative reports while generating additional revenue. Integrating this technology with SourceMedical’s ASCs management software is a win for both surgeons and facilities.”

With SourcePlus OpNote, ASCs are no longer required to spend time and money having surgeons’ postoperative reports transcribed. SourcePlus OpNote makes surgeon reports immediately available via the fully web-based platform to the surgeon and ASC staff. By standardizing documentation and distributing reports simultaneously to all stakeholders immediately after approvals are entered, the entire coding and revenue cycle process is accelerated.

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November 15, 2010 at 10:51 am Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (Part 3)

In this post, the final attempt at making structured data make sense in our daily lives, we’re going to examine one last way that we use structured data. Part one was about baseball, and how statistics are captured and presented to followers of the sport. Part two focused on baking, and how synoptic reporting can find the most concise way of presenting the record of a particular event. So what is this final part of the trilogy about? Is it a synthesis of these Baseball and Baking? Baseking? Bakeball?

Best of Both Worlds

Sorry, David Wells, but I’m going with another All-American past time. Let’s jump in the car and hit the open road as we talk about driving directions!

Was it ever established why the fish don't fry in the kitchen?

We’ve all received those invitations for some event with the directions appearing in large block paragraphs. It looks more like a riddle to be solved than steps to get from here to there. Here’s an example of directions presented in a paragraph form, this one showing how to get from our mTuitive offices to MGM Grand at Foxwoods:

From mTuitive office, drive on Old Stage Road towards Route 6W. Stay on RT 6W as it merges with/becomes MA-25W and then I-195W until you reach the exit for I-95 South (to New York). Take I-95 South to Exit 92 in Connecticut. Go straight at the stoplight. At the next stoplight, turn right onto Route 2 West for eight miles. Take the Foxwoods Blvd / Ledyard Center exit. At the bottom of the exit bear right and take a left at the third light to arrive at the MGM Grand.


Again, it lays out everything perfectly fine, and if I were to follow them, I would be able to adequately go from work to losing all of my money at the craps table.

You Hustlin' Me, Boy?


Another way of viewing these directions is using the format one gets from a GPS device or from Google Maps. (more…)

August 24, 2010 at 2:17 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (Part 2)

In Part One of my attempt at bringing Structured Data from the lofty heights of rhetoric and down into the every day real world, I used America’s favorite 3 hours of intermittent action – Baseball!

I suggest a new strategy, R2: let the Wookiee win.

It was a good, illustrative example of structured data – however, it was a bit impractical. Not many people conduct baseball research using data collected by statisticians. Structured Data may still seem foreign to those not interested in mapping how badly the Red Sox will break your heart this season using metrics and regressions. So let’s get even more grounded and practical – and in doing so, we’ll also examine synoptic reporting, a term that tends to accompany structured data but is not a synonym. So let’s see how we utilize structured data on a near daily basis. Let’s all head to the kitchen!

Last Known Photo of the Inventor of the Double Down


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August 20, 2010 at 2:46 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (part 1)

Still trying to find that needle...

Sometimes it feels like my job wholly consists of talking about structured data. I give definitions and abstract examples – but it’s not easy to help people understand the real benefits of it. And so, as I try to find the best way to get my point across, I often think of real world examples of how structured data is useful in our daily lives and why it tends to be preferable to unstructured, narrative text.

With that in mind – let’s go out to the ball park!

THAT's the Chicago way!

Baseball. America’s Past Time. The Sweet Science. City of Lights. The Ghost and the darkness.

Okay, I’m not the biggest baseball fan. I will watch playoffs and world series. But I do know that a lot of baseball is about numbers: strike outs, home runs, bases stolen, RBIs, wins, losses, saves, ERAs, pitches thrown. Each of these play a crucial factor in determining how well your team is doing or how a player is perceived by his fans. And, following theories like those laid out in Moneyball, these metrics can even determine who will be signed on to your favorite team.

So what does this have to do with structured data? Glad you asked!
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August 18, 2010 at 3:59 pm 2 comments

Interview with Dr. Jared Ament: A New Way to Tell an Old Story

Dr. Jared D. Ament recently completed clinical research fellowships at Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) and at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center (UMass) in surgical outcomes. He has worked with Dr. Dohlman (MEEI) and Dr. Black (Brigham and Women’s Hospital) for 3 years now and with Dr. Richard Moser (UMass) for the last year. His MD is from the Medical School for International Health, a collaborative initiative between Ben-Gurion and Columbia Universities. His MPH is from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is adjunct faculty at Harvard Medical School’s department of Population Health and Epidemiology and has specific interests in cost-effectiveness research, international surgery, surgical outcomes, and medical education. He is currently a surgical resident at UMass.

How did you become interested in medicine?

I was a kid who was fascinated by the workings of the body. I was also very involved in martial arts and interested in the inherent mechanics and physiology. And then, as a teenager interested in culture and public health, I traveled extensively to non-industrialized countries, volunteering in all sorts of public health efforts. I guess I just found a niche where working with people from many cultures, coupled with my fascination for human physiology, struck a cord. The left side of the equation seemed to equal “medicine” on the right.

And how did you decide on being a surgeon, specifically?

Many people just know; for a select minority, however, it’s a struggle between the operating rooms of surgery and the diagnostics and offices of internal medicine (and its specialty fields). I always loved surgery and truly knew that the operating room was where I belonged. Yet, I struggled, as the detective work and thorough understanding of bodily functions was tantalizing. My conclusion, however, was that a good surgeon should, first and foremost, be very strong, clinically. They are, too, diagnosticians, physicians, empathic healers, that have dedicated significant time and training to perfecting a tactile skill in addition to, and very much in parallel with, their medical skills. I am still in training but truly enjoy both the clinic and operating room. I need both. I enjoy the time with my patients; the interaction; the teaching and learning that takes place (bi-directional); collaborating with colleagues (surgical and medical); and hold the operating room, the unconscious patient and the delicate work to be performed with the utmost of respect.
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June 22, 2010 at 1:22 pm 2 comments


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