Posts tagged ‘report’

Dr. John Mattson: “The Paradigm of the Future Hastens the Demise of Dictation”

There’s a new opinion piece by Dr. John Mattson in Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Entitled “3 Reasons Justifying Synoptic Data in Surgical Operative Reports,” the piece examines the inherent problems with dictation and the multiple ways that synoptic reporting improves on this increasingly antiquated system.

Click here to read it!

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January 7, 2011 at 4:17 pm 1 comment

Dr. John Mattson – Streamlining Postoperative Reporting


Orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Mattson, a consultant to mTuitive OpNote, recently gave an interview to Healthcare Informatics about the benefits of mTuitive OpNote and how his experiences with reporting helped inform OpNote’s development.

Click here to read the whole interview!

November 30, 2010 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

RE: EHRs in Surgical Practices

Recently, on his blog “Life as a Healthcare CIO,” Dr. John Halamka gave advice on how to implement EHRs for surgical practices. Dr. Halamka points out many of the issues we’ve found when meeting with surgical practices and ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Surgical practices offer a unique set of problems as they have a very specific purpose, are less likely to have many returning patients, and capture a limited amount of information (the rest being captured by referring general practitioners/primary care physicians and their respective facilities). So where is the incentive for these practices to adopt an electronic solution? How can EHRs address these particular needs without being too disruptive to the surgeons’ workflows? Dr. Halamka has some ideas – based on his own experiences – but I think there’s more to add to this discussion.
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November 17, 2010 at 4:25 pm Leave a comment

SourceMedical Partners with mTuitive to Improve Postoperative Reporting for ASCs and Surgeons

Continues SourceMedical’s tradition of comprehensive solutions for all of surgeons’ needs while utilizing mTuitive’s expertise with electronic medical reporting.

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Birmingham, AL, November 15, 2010 – SourceMedical today announced a partnership with mTuitive, Inc. to help ASCs and surgeons improve postoperative reporting and streamline medical coding processes. Built upon mTuitive’s electronic postoperative reporting solution and fully integrated with the AdvantX, Vision and SurgiSource applications, SourcePlus OpNote will provide ASCs and specialty hospitals with immediate access to surgeons’ postoperative reports and coding data leading to more rapid and accurate revenue cycle processes.

“As an orthopedic surgeon who does exclusively outpatient procedures, I see significant value in the integration of mTuitive’s OpNote into SourceMedical’s management software such as improved reporting for participating ASCs,” said Dr. John Mattson, an active user of the OpNote system. “After a short learning curve, surgeons will find that SourcePlus OpNote is faster than dictating and far less onerous for surgeons as the repetition present in 90 percent of operative reports is eliminated. We now produce superior operative reports while generating additional revenue. Integrating this technology with SourceMedical’s ASCs management software is a win for both surgeons and facilities.”

With SourcePlus OpNote, ASCs are no longer required to spend time and money having surgeons’ postoperative reports transcribed. SourcePlus OpNote makes surgeon reports immediately available via the fully web-based platform to the surgeon and ASC staff. By standardizing documentation and distributing reports simultaneously to all stakeholders immediately after approvals are entered, the entire coding and revenue cycle process is accelerated.

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November 15, 2010 at 10:51 am Leave a comment

A Scanner Darkly

The awkward phase. It’s an unpleasant nebulous moment between two well-defined points. That uncomfortable time as people go from childhood and adulthood. Or that fearful moment full of panic as you go from dating to being in a serious relationship with someone else. It’s that interim state where you’re no longer A but you’re not quite B either.

Medical reporting is currently in its own awkward phase.

In the not so distant past lies Paper Based Reporting – filling out forms using pen and pencil, typewriters, printing out reports and having physical copies of every document located somewhere. This is the world of triplicate, of faxes and envelopes, of white-out and paper shredders. Paper charts physically shipped or moved from practice to practice, facility to facility. Paperland, as I like to call it, does have its advantages, though: a physical document that proves that something happened and to which people can refer; an artifact that precisely records how something occurred at that date and time, without any fear of tampering; a collection of data that cannot be wiped out by a virus or any sort of IT snafu.

Meanwhile, in the not so distant future lies Electronic Based Reporting – entering every information via computers. Using synoptic reports to enter structured data, information is culled directly from machines (think of vital signs being automatically recorded and logged), or easily entered using touchscreens, mouse & keyboard or a stylus of some sort. Electronic reports allow for faster sending of information to a wider range of places. Specialized fields ensure consistency in language and information captured. Required fields and “checklist” approaches encourage more completeness in reporting and more pertinent information is readily captured.1 However, Tronworld, as I’ll refer to it, has its own share of problems. Information can be lost or stolen without any physical backups. There’s ensuring that all systems are speaking the same language when interfacing, so there’s no loss of data or need to reformat the data every time you go from one system to another.

So, between here and there, betwixt Paperland and Tronworld, lies us currently. How are people bridging the divide between the two different modes of reporting? The answer…might surprise you.
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September 13, 2010 at 9:12 am Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (Part 3)

In this post, the final attempt at making structured data make sense in our daily lives, we’re going to examine one last way that we use structured data. Part one was about baseball, and how statistics are captured and presented to followers of the sport. Part two focused on baking, and how synoptic reporting can find the most concise way of presenting the record of a particular event. So what is this final part of the trilogy about? Is it a synthesis of these Baseball and Baking? Baseking? Bakeball?

Best of Both Worlds

Sorry, David Wells, but I’m going with another All-American past time. Let’s jump in the car and hit the open road as we talk about driving directions!

Was it ever established why the fish don't fry in the kitchen?

We’ve all received those invitations for some event with the directions appearing in large block paragraphs. It looks more like a riddle to be solved than steps to get from here to there. Here’s an example of directions presented in a paragraph form, this one showing how to get from our mTuitive offices to MGM Grand at Foxwoods:

From mTuitive office, drive on Old Stage Road towards Route 6W. Stay on RT 6W as it merges with/becomes MA-25W and then I-195W until you reach the exit for I-95 South (to New York). Take I-95 South to Exit 92 in Connecticut. Go straight at the stoplight. At the next stoplight, turn right onto Route 2 West for eight miles. Take the Foxwoods Blvd / Ledyard Center exit. At the bottom of the exit bear right and take a left at the third light to arrive at the MGM Grand.


Again, it lays out everything perfectly fine, and if I were to follow them, I would be able to adequately go from work to losing all of my money at the craps table.

You Hustlin' Me, Boy?


Another way of viewing these directions is using the format one gets from a GPS device or from Google Maps. (more…)

August 24, 2010 at 2:17 pm Leave a comment

What We Talk About When We Talk About Structured Data (Part 2)

In Part One of my attempt at bringing Structured Data from the lofty heights of rhetoric and down into the every day real world, I used America’s favorite 3 hours of intermittent action – Baseball!

I suggest a new strategy, R2: let the Wookiee win.

It was a good, illustrative example of structured data – however, it was a bit impractical. Not many people conduct baseball research using data collected by statisticians. Structured Data may still seem foreign to those not interested in mapping how badly the Red Sox will break your heart this season using metrics and regressions. So let’s get even more grounded and practical – and in doing so, we’ll also examine synoptic reporting, a term that tends to accompany structured data but is not a synonym. So let’s see how we utilize structured data on a near daily basis. Let’s all head to the kitchen!

Last Known Photo of the Inventor of the Double Down


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August 20, 2010 at 2:46 pm Leave a comment

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